Brave Girls: The Rise of the Underdogs of K-POP

SEOUL— A little-known South Korean girl band that was on the verge of breaking up has been thrust into the spotlight after a YouTube video featuring a song they released four years ago went viral.

Brave Girls: The Rise of the Underdogs of K-POP

SEOUL— A little-known South Korean girl band that was on the verge of breaking up has been thrust into the spotlight after a YouTube video featuring a song they released four years ago went viral. Minyoung, Yujeong, Eunji, and Yuna have been members of the K-pop group Brave Girls since 2016, and they were recently considering disbanding, according to their publicity team. That is, until now.

The South Korean girl group Brave Girls was created and produced by Brave Brothers through Brave Entertainment in 2011. Due to their small fan base and their unappreciated company, Brave Girls were failing. A video compilation of their “Rollin‘” performances at South Korean military camps was published on YouTube in late February, as they were about to break up. “If we play this song at the front lines, victory is ours,” the video’s clever tagline read, accompanied by images of South Korean soldiers wildly dancing and cheering to the peppy music. Brave Girls’ fame has soared as a result of the video’s over 13.5 million views and over 38,000 comments.

Brave Girls “Rollin” MV Teaser

The March 2017 song “Rollin‘” is now dominating South Korea’s music charts. The song dethroned soloist IU’s single “Celebrity,” which had held the top spot for seven weeks, on Wednesday’s edition of Billboard’s K-pop 100 list. The South Korean entertainment company Brave Entertainment, which handled the K-pop quartet’s publicity, watched to see if the band’s rapid popularity was temporary. But as soon as their songs started to climb back up the charts, Brave Girls started getting a ton of requests to appear on the stages of regular music shows. Then, on March 14, the group won their first-ever music competition in South Korea with their sleeper hit, “Rollin‘.”

source: rare-gallery.com

Kim Hern-sik, a pop culture critic based in Seoul, claimed that the success of Brave Girls was made possible by the general public’s encouragement of the underdogs. In South Korea, where male citizens between the ages of 18 and 28 are expected to serve in the military for 18 to 21 months, a sizeable section of the Brave Girls fandom consists of service members. Despite the isolated settings and minimal revenue, the girl group has performed more than 100 times at South Korean military facilities. Numerous soldiers watch Brave Girls on military-run television networks while being restricted from using their cell phones.

Finally, Brave Girls keep getting better as their popularity and viewership grow. The band claimed that they did not anticipate this to occur given that the widely popular song was only published in 2017 and that this would not have happened if it weren’t for their devoted fans and their unwavering drive. Brave Girls has up until this day stated that they will rebrand as BB Girls to return to their fans and continue to release summer music under the title “Summer Queens.”

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